Category Archives: History

The Gates of Hell – Stull, Kansas

To wrap up the month of September we have a special guest episode where we interview Stephanie Craig on one of her favorite legends, The Gates of Hell in Stull, Kansas. Stephanie is a fellow podcaster, traveler and history fanatic so be sure to check out her website www.historyfangirl.com.

Stull is the very definition of a small town with just a few inhabitants and a small number of buildings within the city limits. However the lore that is interwoven into the history of Stull reaches far and wide, as it is said to contain one of the Gates of Hell. Its believed that on Halloween and the Spring Solstice the Devil comes to Earth through this gate to summon the spirits of those who died in violent ways. While some of the legends might be thought to be far-fetched, there are numerous rumors of strange encounters that have occurred on the cemetery property in Stull, including the demolishing of the church in a most mysterious manner.

American Sicko

Albert Fish is one of the most horrific serial killers of all time. Despite an alleged lower kill-count than other notorious killers, the brutality of his crimes takes him to an all new level. He is most famous for his quote: “I like children, they are tasty”. However as a boy, Fish was set up for failure. With a family history of psychiatric illness, significant childhood trauma and even physical trauma to his central nervous system, he would go on to develop a sadomasochistic desire for pain. His numerous paraphilias developed over the years along with his bizarre religious delusions. This could be the darkest episode we have ever done at Strange Matters Podcast.

The Mothman

“It’s a bird! It’s a plane! Wait what is that really? Oh no it’s following us, run for your lives!” This is probably what a young couple was thinking in Point Pleasant, West Virginia back in the sixties when they first encountered what is now well-known around the world as the legendary Mothman. There were practically no reports of similar creatures until 1966, when suddenly there were dozens of sightings of this horrific, flying abomination. Residents of this small town were so petrified they actually held a town hall meeting so that citizens could publicly express their concerns and share tales of their encounters. Since then similar sightings have been reported all over the world; all to often the sightings precede some sort of cataclysmic event, leading some to think that it is an omen of bad things to come. While it is not one of the most popular cryptids of our time, it certainly produces arguably more convincing evidence then others of its kind. Explanations for these sightings range from large cranes or owls all the way to angels, genetic hybrids and flying military machines, however we must accept that mankind may never know the true identity of the Mothman.

Cynocephaly

In this episode of Strange Matters we discuss the phenomenon of Cynocephaly, the bizarre characteristic of humans that possess a dog-like head.  Creatures of cynocephaly have been recorded in human history for thousands of years, dating back to the Ancient Greeks and Egyptians.  Tales of these human/dog mixes have been seen throughout the middle ages and even up to the modern day.  The origins of these mysterious beings remain a mystery, as well as to why stories of them exist all over the world.

Though commonly believed to be a mere myth, some have come up with several logical reasons behind the origins of these creatures to explain their existence and persistence throughout history.  Some theories suggest ancient people mistook certain animals to be cynocephali, while others think people portrayed as these half-dog beasts were simply how civilized societies represented foreigners and barbarians.  Whether there is any realistic explanations for these fantastical creatures will forever be unknown, but the legends of cynocephaly continue to be an intriguing historical mystery!

SPECIAL – Local Legends Collaboration

Listen to this special collaborative episode between Strange Matters, Don’t Break the Oath, Zeng This, and Knock Once For Yes Podcasts!  Each of the podcasts and their host discuss a number of local urban legends, mysteries, and unexplained events.

From a morbid group of sisters who had a dark reputation for murder, a cemetery vampire, unexplained UFOs, and some  ghostly hauntings, check out this episode to hear a range of interesting and creepy stories!

Big thanks to the hosts of Don’t Break the Oath, Zeng This, & Knock Once For Yes podcasts for working with us on this episode!

 

 

Haitian Zombification

In this episode we discuss some of the most convincing, interesting and disturbing reports of real-life zombies. The first story is about a Haitian man named Clairvius Narcisse. At the age of 40, Narcisse died under mysterious circumstances and was buried. 18 years later and much to his sister’s horror, he reappeared and greeted her in a marketplace. Most people believe he was cursed by a witch doctor who used tetrodotoxin to make him appear dead. Once buried, the witch doctor (known as a “bokor”) revived and enslaved Narcisse on his plantation. While far-fetched, this story is likely plausible as there exists a strong cultural belief in zombies in the Haitian culture. This in conjunction with the toxins he was exposed to could possible have created a placebo effect convincing Narcisse that he was a real-life zombie.

Rudy Eugene, also known as the Miami Cannibal is known for pouncing on an innocent, homeless man and gnawing 75% of his face off. Initially thought to be under the influence of some recreational hallucinogens, Eugene was shot and died at the scene of the crime. Later toxicology reports showed only trace amounts of marijuana in his body. This has gone down as one of the most disturbing and violent scenes in Miami as many witnesses report. But if not drugs, what could have caused Eugene to commit this horrific crime?